Broken Clown

Here’s a NEW artwork from Acrylic Math!

Broken Clown

Description: Amazing geometric abstract wall art! The artwork displays a stylized geometric face of a clown made with semi-ellipses. The style parallels the style of Kandinsky and others but is based on math.
Specifications: 12 in by 16 in by 3/4 in (30.48 cm by 40.64 cm by 1.90 cm) giclee print on a stretched canvas (unframed).
Background: GEOMETRY, from the Greek geo (land) and the Greek metria (measurement), is the branch of mathematics that focuses on objects on a plane. Euclides, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, in a book titled The Elements of Geometry, set forth, in great detail, the foundations of modern geometry. ELLIPSES are flattened circles where the sum of the distances from two points, called the foci, to every point on the ellipse is constant. CLOWNS have been favored by artists by and children of all ages.

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Patty Evans

April 2019’s topic of The GalleseumAcrylic Math’s FREE monthly art newsletter– is about a Contemporary Artist: Patty Evans of Fort Myers, Florida. And, this is the corresponding Blog Post.

Wood Abstract

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Blog Post

Selected artworks of Patty follow (Reprinted with permission). Patty sells her artwork on Etsy. Here’s the link to Patty’s shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/PattyEvansArt

Blue Serenity
Wood Abstract
Wood Abstract
Wood Abstract
Wood Abstract

Wassily Kandinsky

March 2019’s topic of The GalleseumAcrylic Math’s FREE monthly art newsletter– is about a Great Artist: Wassily Kandinsky, who was one of the pioneers of geometric abstraction. And, this is the corresponding Blog Post.

Blue Painting

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Blog Post

Kandinsky (1866 – 1944), a Russian-born artist who lived in Germany and France, was one of the pioneers of geometric abstraction.

Selected Artworks

The following artworks by Kandinsky are but a few examples of geometric abstraction: Figure 1 (Point. Wassilly Kandinsky. Public domain. [1]), Figure 2 (Surfaces and Lines. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [2]), Figure 3 Sign. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [3]), Figure 4 (Deepened Impulse. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [4]), Figure 5 (Composition. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [5]), Figure 6 (Color Study. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [6]), and Figure 7 (Blue Painting. Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain. [7]).

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7

Endnotes

[1] Kandinsky. W. (1920). Points. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wassily_Kandinsky,_1920_-_Points.jpg

[2] Kandinsky. W. (1930). Surfaces and lines. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%27Surfaces_and_Lines

[3] Kandinsky, W. (1925), Sign. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%27Sign%27_by_Wassily_Kandinsky,_1925,_oil_on_cardboard,_LACMA.JPG

[4] Kandinsky, W. (1928). Deepened impulse. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vertiefte_Regung_(Deepened_Impulse)_by_Wassily_Kandinsky,_1928.jpg

[5] Kandinsky, W. (1927). Composition. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kandinsky,_Composition_(1927).jpg

[6] Kandinsky, W. (1913). Color study. From Wikipedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vassily_Kandinsky,_1913_-_Color_Study,_Squares_with_Concentric_Circles.jpg

[7] Kandinsky, W. (1924). Blue painting, From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vassily_Kandinsky,_1924_-Blue_Painting.jpg

Geometric Khaos

Here’s a NEW artwork from Acrylic Math!

Geometric Khaos

Description: In the artwork, chaos dictates the dizzying display of geometric lines and shapes. The style parallels the style of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and others but is based on math.
Specifications: 12 in by 16 in by 3/4 in (30.48 cm by 40.64 cm by 1.90 cm) giclee print on a stretched canvas (unframed).
Math: GEOMETRY, from the Greek geo (land) and the Greek metria (measurement), is the branch of mathematics that focuses on objects on a plane. Euclides, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, in a book titled The Elements of Geometry, set forth, in great detail, the foundations of modern geometry. CHAOS, from the Greek khaos (empty), nowadays, is defined as lack of organization.

My Etsy

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Art and Greek Geometry

February 2019’s topic of The GalleseumAcrylic Math’s FREE monthly art newsletter– is about Art and Greek Geometry. And, this is the corresponding Blog Post.

Kandinsky

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Blog Post

This Blog Post describes the relationship between art and Greek (i.e., classical) geometry. A future article will address fractal geometry. Geometry, from the Greek geo (land) and the Greek metria (measurement), is the branch of mathematics that focuses on objects on a plane. There are myriad objects, such as points, lines, circles, and cubes. And, there are two types of planes: two-dimensional planes and three-dimensional planes. Objects, such as circles and squares, are the domain of plane geometry; cubes and spheres are the domain of solid geometry. Geometric perspective is a way of displaying three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional plane. Visual arts, such as drawing and painting display objects and use perspective and, therefore, are rooted in geometry. [1] [2]

History

Geometry dates back to antiquity. The Babylonians, the Chinese, the Egyptians, and the Indians all dwelt in geometry. But, Euclides, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, in a book titled The Elements of Geometry, set forth, in great detail, the foundations of modern geometry. Euclid dwelt in both plane and solid geometry. [2]
Throughout history, artists, consciously, or subconsciously, have used geometry for art design. Figure 1 (Black and Violet by Wassily Kandinsky. Public domain [3]) displays an obvious use of geometry in art composition.

Figure 1

And, oftentimes, in modern drawing textbooks, such as Drawing for the Absolute Beginner by Mark and Mary Willenbrink, the authors advise art students, to first use simple geometric shapes to compose drawings. [4]

Geometric Perspective

Geometric perspective, from the Latin perspicere (to see through) is a way of drawing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface. A one point perspective has one vanishing point. A two-point perspective has two vanishing points. And, a three-point perspective has three vanishing points.[5] Figure 2 (Types of Perspective. © Dr. 2019 Anthony Rodriguez) displays the three types of perspective.

Figure 2

Perspective has been used by artists from Before Christ. Figure 3 (The Healing of Thabitha by Masolino. Public domain [6]) displays the use of perspective.

Figure 3

Geometric Objects

Figures 4 (Landscape by Ivan Kliun. Public domain [7]), Figure 5 (Architectonics by Liubov Popova. Public domain. [8]), Figure 6 (Seated Woman by Maria Blanchard. Public domain. [9]), and Figure 7 (Geometric Composition by Georges Valmier. Public domain. [10]) display a few examples of the conscious or subconscious use of geometry in art composition.

Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7

Summary

Artists have long used geometric objects and perspective. This brief Blog Post presented but a few examples of such usage.

Endnotes

[1] Mathematics and art. (2018). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_and_art

[2] History of geometry. (2019). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_geometry

[3] Kandinsky, W. (1923). Black and violet. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vasily_Kandinsky_-_Black_and_Violet.jpg

[4] Willenbrink, M. and Willenbrink, M. Drawing for the absolute beginner. Cincinnati, OH: North Light Books.

[5] Masolino. (1420s). The healing of Tabitha. From Wikimedia Commoms. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Masolino_Brancacci_Chapel_01.jpg

[6] Perspective. (2018). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(graphical)

[7] Kliun, I. (n.d.). Landscape. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Landscape_Racing_By.png

[8] Popova, L. (1916). Architectonics. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1916_Popova_Die_bildliche_Architektonik_anagoria.JPG

[9] Blanchard, M. (1917). Seated Woman. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Femme_Assise_(Seated_Woman),_by_Maria_Blanchard,_Spanish,_c._1917,_oil_on_canvas_-_Meadows_Museum_-_Southern_Methodist_University_-_DSC05425.jpg

[10] Valmier, G. (1930). Geometric composition. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Georges_Valmier_geometric-composition-1930.jpg

Golden Spiral

Here’s a NEW artwork from Acrylic Math!

Golden Spiral

Description: The artwork features an approximation of the golden spiral created using golden rectangles.
Specifications: 12 in by 16 in by 3/4 in (30.48 cm by 40.64 cm by 1.90 cm) giclee print on a stretched canvas (unframed).
Math: In geometry, a golden spiral is a logarithmic spiral whose growth factor is φ (i.e., 1.6180), the golden ratio. That is, a golden spiral gets wider (or further from its origin) by a factor of φ for every quarter turn it makes.

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An Odd Couple: Art and Math

January 2019’s topic of The GalleseumAcrylic Math’s FREE monthly art newsletter– is about the relationship between art and math, which dates back to antiquity and spans to modern times. And, this is the corresponding Blog Post.

An Odd Couple?
Art and Math

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Blog Post

An odd couple? Not really! The relationship between art and math dates back to antiquity and spans to modern times. In 4 BC, the Greek sculptor Polykleitos of Argos described the ideal mathematical proportions of the human body in a work titled the Kanon. [1] [2] During the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci, the Italian genius, also described the ideal mathematical proportions of the human body in a drawing titled L’Uomo Vitruviano [3] (See Figure 1: The Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci. Public domain. [4])

The Vitruvian Man

And, in modern times, Piet Mondrian, the famous Dutch painter, used simple geometric elements in his work [5] (See Figure 2: Composition No. III by Piet Mondrian. Public domain. [6]).

Figure 2

The Golden Ratio

The golden ratio is represented by the Geek letter phi (φ), is equal to 1.618034…, and was defined by Euclid, the father of geometry, in a work titled Elements. [7] Oftentimes, the golden ratio is displayed as the golden rectangle, whose sides are equal to 1: φ [8] (See Figure 3: Golden rectangle. Public domain. [9]).

Figure 3

Art cognoscenti have identified the use of the golden rectangle in design. For example, Samuel Obara of the Department of Mathematics of the University of Georgia recognized some φ-based rectangles in Piet Mondrian’s Composition No. II [10] (See Figure 4: Composition No. II by Piet Mondrian. Public domain. [11]).

Figure 4

Tessellations

Tessellations, from the Latin tessella (small square), are tilings of continuous shapes: Euclidean, organic, and three-dimensional. [12] Figure 5 (Penrose tiling. Public domain. [13]) displays an example of a tessellation.

Figure 5

Tesselations were used in ancient Rome and in the Islamic world, notably in the Alhambra, in Granada, Spain (See Figure 6: Tessellation, Alhambra, Seville, Spain. © 2007 Gruban. Reprinted with permission. [14]) In modern times, the renowned Dutch artist M.C. Escher use tessellations in his work. [12]

Figure 6

Fractals

Fractals, from the Latin fractus (broken), are detailed patterns that endlessly repeat themselves at different scales. Fractals are characterized by self-similarity and non-integer dimensions. [15] [16] Fractal geometry is rooted in the seminal works of Gottfried Leibniz, the 17th century German philosopher and mathematician, and others that followed, notably Benoit Mandelbrot, the 20th century Polish-born mathematician. [17] Figure 7 (Triangle fractal. © Fractal Foundation. Reprinted with permission. [16]) displays an example of a fractal.

Figure 7

Summary

Myriad examples document the relationship between art and math. The three topics briefly presented herein -the golden ratio, tessellations, and fractals- are but “small cogs in the large wheel” of art and math.

Endnotes

[1] Mathematics and art. (2018). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_and_art

[2] Polyclitus. (2018). From Encyclopedia Britannica. URL: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Polyclitus

[3] Vitruvian Man. (2018). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitruvian_Man

[4] Da Vince, L. (2018). Vitruvian Man. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Da_Vinci_Vitruve_Luc_Viatour.jpg

[5] Jaffe, H.L.C. (2018). Piet Mondrian. From Encyclopedia Britannica. URL: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Piet-Mondrian

[6] Mondrian, P. (1929). Composition No. III. From The Athenaeum. URL: https://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/detail.php?ID=85852

[7] Berry, B. (2017). What is the golden ratio? From Math Hacks. URL: https://medium.com/i-math/what-is-the-golden-ratio-d3cc17c8fefd

[8] Golden rectangle. (2018). From Wikipedia’s. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rectangle

[9] Golden Rectangle. (2018). From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SimilarGoldenRectangles.svg

[10] Obara, S. (n.d.). Golden ratio in art and architecture. From The University of Georgia, URL: http://jwilson.coe.uga.edu/EMT668/EMAT6680.2000/Obara/Emat6690/Golden%20Ratio/golden.html

[11] Mondrian, P. (1030). Composition No. II. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Piet_Mondriaan,_1930_-_Mondrian_Composition_II_in_Red,_Blue,_and_Yellow.jpg

[12] Tessellation. (2018). From Wikipedia. URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellation

[13] Penrose tiling. (2009). From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Penrose_Tiling_(P1_over_P3).svg

[14] Gruban. P. (2007). Tesselletion, Alhambra, Seville, Spain. From Wikimedia Commons. URL: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tassellatura_alhambra.jpg

[15] Fractal. (2018). From Encyclopedia Britannica. URL: https://www.britannica.com/science/fractal

[16] What is a fractal? (n.d.) From Fractal Foundation. URL: https://fractalfoundation.org/fractivities/WhatIsaFractal-1pager.pdf

[17] Fractal. (2018). From Wikipedia.URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal

Main Street: Yesterday and Today

Here’s a NEW artwork from Acrylic Math!

Main Street: Yesterday and Today

Description: The artwork features Main Street, Any Town, USA, viewed in the past and in the present.
Specifications: 12 in by 16 in by 3/4 in (30.48 cm by 40.64 cm by 1.90 cm) giclee print on a stretched canvas (unframed).
Background: In 1895, H.G. Wells, an English writer, popularized the notion of time travel and, in 1916, Albert Einstein, a German-born physicist, theorized about the relationship between space, which is three dimensional, and time, which is the fourth dimension. This artwork blends the past and the present.

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